Alia Malek

Alia Malek is a journalist and former civil rights lawyer. She is the author of ACountry Called Amreeka: US History Re-Told Through Arab American Livesand editor of Patriot Acts: Narratives of Post 9/11 Injustices. With collaborators the Magnum Foundation and Al Liquidoi, Alia edited and co-conceived EUROPA أوروپا  : An Illustrated Introduction to Europe for Migrants and Refugees, released in Europe and her latest book is The Home That Was Our Country: A Memoir of Syria. Born in Baltimore to Syrian immigrant parents, she began her legal career as a trial attorney at the U.S. Department of Justice’s Civil Rights Division. After working in the legal field in the U.S., Lebanon, and the West Bank, Malek, who has degrees from Johns Hopkins and Georgetown universities, earned her master’s degree in journalism from Columbia University. In April 2011, she moved to Damascus, Syria and wrote anonymously for several outlets from inside the country as it began to disintegrate. Her reporting from Syria earned her the Marie Colvin Award in November 2013. She returned to the U.S. in May 2013 for the launch of Al Jazeera America, where she was Senior Writer until October 2015. After her departure, she was a Puffin Foundation Writing Fellow at the Nation Institute and in residence at the MacDowell Colony. In November 2016, she was honored with the 12th annual Hiett Prize in the Humanities.

Beowulf Sheehan

Beowulf Sheehan was raised in South Florida and abroad, He studied photography at New York University and the International Center of Photography.  His childhood love of stories in books and music grew into an adulthood love of storytellers in the arts, entertainment, and humanities.  Beowulf makes portraits, communicates ideas, and shares the stories of unique and compelling artists and public figures who impact society and culture. His new book Author: The Portraits of Beowulf Sheehan will be released October 9. He lives in New York City.

Daniel Wolff

Daniel Wolff is the author of The Fight for Home; How Lincoln Learned to Read; 4th of July/Asbury Park; and You Send Me: The Life and Times of Sam Cooke, which won the Ralph J. Gleason Music Book Award. His new book is Grown-Up Anger: The Connected Mysteries of Bob Dylan, Woody Guthrie, and the Calumet Massacre of 1913. He’s been nominated for a Grammy, published three collections of poetry, and collaborated with, among others, songwriters, documentary filmmakers, photographers, and choreographer Marta Renzi, his wife.

Ryan H. Walsh

Ryan H. Walsh is a musician and journalist. His culture writing has appeared in the Boston Globe, Vice, and Boston Magazine. He was a finalist for the Missouri School of Journalism’s City and Regional Magazine Award for his feature on Van Morrison’s year in Boston, from which his new, critically acclaimed book, Astral Weeks: A Secret History of 1968, developed. His rock band Hallelujah the Hills has won praise from Spin magazine and Pitchfork; collaborated on a song with author Jonathan Lethem; and toured the U.S. extensively over their 10-year existence. The band won a Boston Music Award for Best Rock Artist, and Walsh has twice won the award for Best Video Direction. He lives in Boston with his wife, the acclaimed singer-songwriter Marissa Nadler.

Ramie Targoff

Ramie Targoff is a Professor of English at Brandeis University here she teaches and studies Renaissance literature, with an emphasis on the relationship between literature and religion. She has written books on the invention of common prayer and its influence on Renaissance devotional poetry; on the works of the poet and preacher John Donne; and on Renaissance love poetry. Her new book, Renaissance Woman, is a biography of the sixteenth-century Italian poet, Vittoria Colonna. She lives in Cambridge, MA. 185