Ben Green

Ben Green is a PhD Candidate in Applied Math at the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences and an Affiliate at the Berkman Klein Center for Internet and Society at Harvard. He studies the implementation and impacts of data science in local governments, with a focus on “smart cities” and the criminal justice system. His book, The Smart Enough City: Putting Technology in Its Place to Reclaim Our Urban Future, was published in April 2019 by MIT Press.

Xu Xi

Xu Xi is the author of thirteen books, including five novels, six collections of short fiction & essays and most recently Insignificance: Hong Kong Stories; the memoir Dear Hong Kong: An Elegy for a City, as part of Penguin’s Hong Kong series for the 20th anniversary of Hong Kong’s handover to China. She is also editor of four anthologies of Hong Kong writing in English. Her new book is an essay collection This Fish Is Fowl: Essays of Being. A former Indonesian national, born and raised in Hong Kong, she eventually morphed into a U.S. citizen at the age of 33, having washed onto that distant shore across from Lady Liberty. These days, she splits time, unevenly, between the state of New York and the rest of the world (sightline towards that land of childhood memory, Indonesia) and mourns the loss of her beloved writing retreat in Seacliff, on the South Island of New Zealand, where she hovered, joyously, for seven years.

Brenda Wineapple

Brenda Wineapple is the author a new book,The Impeachers: The Trial of Andrew Johnson and the Dream of a Just Nation, the award-winning Hawthorne: A Life, Genêt: A Biography of Janet Flanner, White Heat: The Friendship of Emily Dickinson and Thomas Wentworth Higginson,  and Sister Brother: Gertrude and Leo Stein. Her essays, articles, and reviews have appeared in many publications, among them The American Scholar, The New York Times Book Review, Parnassus, Poetry, and The Nation. A Guggenheim fellow, a fellow of the American Council of Learned Societies, and twice of the National Endowment for the Humanities, she teaches in the MFA programs at Columbia University and The New School and lives in New York City.

Paige Williams

Paige Williams is a staff writer at The New Yorker and a Mississippi native. A National Magazine Award winner for feature writing, she has had her journalism anthologized in various volumes of the Best American series, including The Best Magazine Writing and The Best American Crime Writing. She is the Laventhol/Newsday Visiting Professor at Columbia University’s Graduate School of Journalism, and has taught at schools including the University of Mississippi, New York University, the Missouri School of Journalism, and, at M.I.T., in the Knight Science Journalism program. Williams has been a fellow of The MacDowell Colony and was a Nieman Fellow at Harvard. At The New Yorker, she has written about suburban politics in Detroit, the death penalty in Alabama, paleoanthropology in South Africa, and the theft of cultural palimony from the Tlingit peoples of Alaska. She is the author of The Dinosaur Artist: Obsession, Betrayal, and the Quest for Earth’s Ultimate Trophy.

 

Katharine Smyth

Katharine Smyth is a writer based in Brooklyn, NY. After graduating magna cum laude from Brown University, she worked as an editorial assistant and researcher at The Paris Review and Radar Magazine. In 2007, she began teaching at Columbia University, where she received her MFA in nonfiction and was awarded a Dean’s Fellowship. Her essays and articles have appeared in Elle, The Paris Review, Literary Hub, The Point, DuJour, Poets & Writers, and Domino, among other publications. Her first book, All the Lives We Ever Lived: Seeking Solace in Virginia Woolf, was published in January 2019 and named a New York Times Book Review Editors’ Choice.